Cotswold Chatterblog

Bringing you Cotswold news and events

From Little Gidding B&B near Chipping Campden

Telephone+44(0)1386 593302   Emailbookings@ebrington.com
Mobile+44(0)7968 232854

Chipping Campden Bulletin Archive


Chipping Campden 1914-18, Appeal for information

Chipping Campden Bulletin, Noticeboard by Adam No Comments »

The text for the book is virtually finished and at the present moment there are 460 people with entries in the book. Throughout the six weeks school holiday I will be inserting the photographs into the text and laying out all of the pages. I would like to take this opportunity to thank the people of Campden and the relatives of the people in the book for being so helpful over the last few years. I hope that the book will be a fitting tribute to the people from Campden who served during the Great War.

I am making one last plea for help on the following men: Edward Brooks. Charles Burnett. Reginald Cairns. Arthur William Cherry. John Codrington. William Haylock. Arthur Jones. Percy Lane. H.B. Lewis. Jack Midgley. Cyril Sheadman. Julian Simpson. Frederick Smith (I have two but I need three different Frederick Smith’s.) William Smith (I have one but I need two different William Smith’s.) John Smith. Frank Thorne. E.E. West. Thomas Wheeler.

I have searched church records, census returns and the Evesham Journal. Any help, no matter how small would really be appreciated.

Paul Hughes

If you can help with any information, please add a comment to this article or contact us at info@ebrington.com and we will pass on your message to Paul.

(From the Chipping Campden Bulletin. Included with kind permission of Jeremy Green)

Chipping Campden floods – letters of thanks

Chipping Campden Bulletin, Letters by Adam No Comments »

Dear Jeremy

The flash floods that hit Chipping Campden and the surrounding areas last Friday may have caused less devastation than the rivers that burst their banks in other parts of the country, but anyone who has been in any way affected by similar natural occurrences will understand how traumatic it can be to find your home and belongings badly damaged, if not quite wrecked.

So we would like to pay a little tribute through your pages to all the good friends, neighbours and kind souls who came rushing to help us when we were so greatly in need: Maralyn and Bill from Paxford, Anne and Ken from Mickleton, Pearl and John from up the road, Geraldine and Tony from across the road who had their own damage to attend to, Maureen who brought food and drink for everybody and stayed cleaning the whole day and Phil the Minister from the Baptist Church, who not only brought words of comfort but got himself thoroughly filthy carrying furniture and ruined possessions from the house to the road, from where everything was speedily removed in countless journeys by Graham and Conrad. Read the rest of this entry »

100 Years of Hidcote Manor Gardens – Restoring the garden to its heyday

Chipping Campden Bulletin, Noticeboard, Places by Adam No Comments »


Following on from July’s article…

After Lawrence Johnston’s death on 27 April 1958, the National Trust sought to let the manor house in order to raise some funds to help to maintain Hidcote Manor garden and had a freer hand to manage the garden. The furnishings in the house had already been sold at a sale at the property in late 1956 and then work was done to bring the house into a suitable state for letting.

Several prospective tenants were interviewed in September 1958 by the secretary of the National Trust. This resulted in a fourteen year tenancy at a rental of £250 a year being offered to Sir Gawain Bell who accepted it and undertook to furnish Hidcote as soon as possible. His intention was to make Hidcote his home when he retired from the Foreign Office in 1960.

It was evident in these early years that the National Trust had an annual deficit of some £1,000 to £2,000 each year in the running of Hidcote and this shortfall had to be found from the gardens fund. Consequently, when structures in the garden, such as the plant house by the lily pond, fell into disrepair consideration was given to whether to repair or demolish it. Although it was initially decided to repair it, the lack of funds led to a decision to demolish it. Sir Edward Salisbury, director of Kew, visited to identify which plants should be retained in a smaller plant shelter elsewhere in the garden. Read the rest of this entry »

Campden Skies, July 2007

Campden Skies, Chipping Campden Bulletin by Adam No Comments »

Early this month in the twilight just after sunset look for Venus still bright in the west. Then look a little more and not far away you will find another object shining without twinkling. That will be the planet Saturn. Both will have disappeared into the sunset glow by the end of the month.

Planets appear to move amongst the fixed stars and so attracted the attention of the early civilisations. Saturn was named by the Romans for the father of the king of the gods, Jupiter. This planet was the most distant known to the ancients and travelled through the stars more slowly than any other planet they watched. Thus it seemed logical to name it for an elderly and presumably slow-moving god. The planet speeding fastest was called Mercury – the messenger of the gods whose sandals were winged. Venus is the brightest and most beautiful planet visible from Earth and not surprisingly was named for the goddess of beauty and love.

As you will see, Venus is far more brilliant than Saturn. Indeed you may not be able to make out the latter until the twilight begins to darken. Does this mean that Venus is bigger than Saturn? By no means – it is just an optical effect of distance. Just as a candle in your hand would seem brighter than a searchlight miles away so nearby but tiny Venus outshines gigantic but distant Saturn. Both shine by reflected sunlight.

Venus orbits the Sun inside the Earth’s orbit and so shows phases, like the Moon. At present it is crescent shaped and you may be able to see this with binoculars – after sunset. As the month progresses the planet will not appear any dimmer even though the illuminated portion will shrink day by day as it gets ever closer to the Sun. This is because it is coming closer to Earth and the disc is getting larger. For all its brilliance it is a little smaller than the Earth, another rocky planet and with complete cloud cover that reflects much of the sunlight. Its diameter is 12,104 km. (The equatorial diameter of the Earth is 12,756 km and the polar is 12,714 km.)

In between Earth and Saturn lie the orbits of Mars, the asteroids and Jupiter. It is a gas-giant very far away. At present it is on the opposite side of the Sun to us so its apparent closeness to Venus is just due to the effect of the line-of-sight. Its equatorial diameter is 120,000 km and the polar is 107,100 km. These figures do not include its rings which can only be seen though a telescope. In spite of its size, Saturn’s mass is not as much as might be expected. If an ocean large enough could be provided, Saturn would float! It is far enough from the Sun to travel at only a little under 10 km a second.

The strength of the pull of gravity falls off with distance and that means the closer to the Sun the faster an object must orbit to avoid falling in. Earth orbits at just under 30 km a second but Venus has to keep up fractionally over 35 km a second. Mercury travels at just under 48 km a second. No wonder that another name for mercury is quicksilver.

If you are a bit giddy at the thought of the speed you are travelling, add in the effect of the daily rotation that whizzes you round many thousands of miles every 24 hours and the motion of the Sun itself, dragging its collection of planets, orbiting the centre of the Galaxy; and we must not forget that the Galaxy itself is moving within its cluster of galaxies. That cluster of galaxies is no doubt heading somewhere but we’ll leave it there as I’m a little dizzy.

Jill Wilson
(From the Chipping Campden Bulletin. Included with kind permission of Jeremy Green)

Chipping Campden Music Festival

Chipping Campden Bulletin, Events, Noticeboard by Adam 1 Comment »

President Paul Lewis
Principal sponsor of the 2007 festival – Jackson Stops & Staff. Steinway piano sponsored by Cutts of Campden.

I am delighted to report that the 2007 festival was another great success. Ticket sales were well up on 2006 and although fees were also considerably higher than last year we have finished up with a surplus to carry forward to 2008. As always our performers seemed to love both the venue and the atmosphere the festival generates. The following are just some of the comments we received from this year’s artists:

“To play to such an enthusiastic and concentrated capacity crowd was quite a compliment and I am most grateful for all you did… my warmest gratitude for another totally enjoyable visit to your superb Festival – long may it last and prosper. You have turned it into a remarkable success story!” John Lill.

“I saw the orchestra today at their Colin Davis rehearsals, and they were all saying how much they enjoyed last night, and what a fabulous venue the church is! Charlotte also reported that you and your team were wonderfully helpful and hospitable. Many thanks for the invitation and for being so great to work with” Pauline Gilberton director English Chamber Orchestra.

“The best venue we have ever played in in the UK” Igor Naidfn – viola player of the Borodin quartet.

“Thanks so much again – the concert on Friday was fantastic and the orchestra were very glad to have a concert in such a beautiful setting, and much closer to home after five months of non-stop touring!” Tara Persaud concerts manager Academy of St Martin in the Fields.

I would like to thank everyone who became a ‘Patron’, ‘Friend’ or ‘Sponsor’ this year, without whose help the festival would not survive. There are too many to name everyone but the following deserve a particular mention; Jackson Stops & Staff for, once again, being our principal sponsor. Cutts of Campden for sponsoring the Steinway piano for the 6th year. Cotswold House Hotel for sponsoring, for the fourth year, the jazz supper.

I would also like to thank everyone who helped in any way with the day to day running of the event. Again there is not room to mention everyone but the following worked particularly hard; Richard Stephens, Ivor & Jean Owen, Arthur & Rachel Cunyghame, Micaela Schmitz, Jessica May. Finally thank you to Campden Bowling club and to W.R. Haines & Sons for allowing us to display the large advertising boards on their properties and Jeremy Green for all the advertising in his Bulletin. Next year’s festival will run from Tuesday 13th – Saturday 24th May. Details will be published in November 2007.

Before then we have two ‘one off concerts both in St. James’ church at 7.30pm The Coronation of Poppea Saturday September 22nd – tickets £10 adults £5 students – on the door only. A fully staged production of the opera with professional orchestra and advanced singers from the top UK colleges.

Paul Lewis Saturday Dec 1st 7.30pm. Beethoven’s last three piano sonatas op109/110/111. This will be the final time Paul plays this programme in the UK

Booking forms will be sent to everyone on the festival database in July. Box office opens August 1st.
(From the Chipping Campden Bulletin. included with kind permission of Jeremy Green)

Chipping Campden – Sequel to the Scuttlebrook wake verse

Chipping Campden Bulletin, Noticeboard by Adam No Comments »

1915

A sequel to our ’1915′ Scuttlebrook poem saga has emerged. Further anecdotal evidence suggests that Scuttlebrook Wake again came under threat soon after the opening of the recreation ground in 1934 and another Coldicott was involved. A ‘Save Scuttlebrook Wake in Leasbourne’ group ( of which Fred Coldicott was a member) sprang up following the town council’s insistence that all future celebrations, including Scuttlebrook, should take place in ‘their’ new field. The group organised their own ‘Leasbourne’ Scuttlebrook celebrations by putting up stalls, donkey rides and selling refreshments.

Tradition triumphed as Scuttlebrook retreated from the recreation ground to be unanimously celebrated the following year (1935) in Leasbourne. During WWII one stall was erected by Laurence Ladbrook to keep the charter intact and maintain the tradition.

Unfortunately the last line was missed from the poem in the last Bulletin, the last verse should have read

So just let our brave lads know at the front
And the kiddies they ‘ve left behind,
That good old Campden’s flag still flies
For the sake of “Ye Olden Times”!!

The Archive Room at the Old Police Station, Chipping Campden
(From the Chipping Campden Bulletin. included with kind permission of Jeremy Green)

 

Flower Power in Chipping Campden at St James Church

Chipping Campden Bulletin, Events, Noticeboard by Adam 2 Comments »

St James, Chipping Campden (c) Rick, ligthelm.multiply.com
Flower Festival, St James Church Chipping Campden 24th to 28th August

The pace is quickening for the forthcoming flower festival at St James Church over the bank holiday week end (from Friday August 24th to Tuesday August 28th). Four very successful fund raising events hosted by Rachel and Arthur Cunynghame, Sarah and Peter Taylor, Philip and Mary Smith, and two events by Margaret and Geoffrey Smith have succeeded in raising well over £3,000 for flower festival funds.

The theme of Old Testament tales will blossom into life in scenes created by distinguished designer Jenny Bennett, and imaginatively interpreted by flower club teams from Chipping Campden and surrounding areas.

A summer market, organized by Jane Bartlett will be an attractive additional feature of the festival and on Saturday, Sunday and Monday will set up its stalls in the front garden of Margaret and Geoffrey Smith’s home directly opposite the church. The market will offer bric-a-brac, books, plants and preserves; and that’s not all. Delicious teas and light lunches under the direction of Jecca Brook will be available in the Church Rooms.

Festival co-ordinator David Hallett is hopeful that the festival will attract record numbers. He says “We are hoping that Campden residents and visitors will come and see the really wonderful floral displays, and if anyone has guests over the bank holiday weekend that they will bring them to admire both one of the area’s loveliest churches and the biblical stories told in flowers”.

(From the Chipping Campden Bulletin. Included with kind permission of Jeremy Green)

Little Gidding B&B is located in Ebrington and is minutes away from Chipping Campden. We would be happy to book you for a stay during the festival.

100 years of Hidcote Manor Garden continued

Chipping Campden Bulletin, Places by Adam 1 Comment »


In the June Bulletin, the events of 100 years ago when Lawrence Johnston and his mother, Mrs Gertrude Winthrop, came to Hidcote Manor and then the subsequent creation of Hidcote Manor garden leading up to its heyday in the 1930s were recalled. In this article, the transfer to the National Trust in 1948 and subsequent developments at Hidcote up to Lawrence Johnston’s death in 1958 are covered.

In the 1930s, Lawrence Johnston was actively engaged in seeking plants for Hidcote or for his garden at Serre de la Madone at Menton on the south coast of France. He was both a sponsor of, and went on, plant hunting expeditions to places such as Formosa (Taiwan) and to Yunnan in China. When he was at Hidcote, he led an active social life as his diaries for 1929 and 1932 show that there were many coming to see the garden or to play tennis. Towards the end of the 1930s when he was in his late 60s, he spent his summers at Hidcote and the winter months at Serre de la Madone.

During the second World War he was concerned about the taxation associated with living in England and began to consider what he should do about Hidcote. James Lees-Milne, whose parents used to live at Wickhamford, records in his diary that in February 1943 at a luncheon organised by Sibyl Colefax, an influential figure in London society who is mentioned a few times in Lawrence Johnston’s diaries, Johnston took him aside to ask if the National Trust would take over Hidcote without endowment after the war when he intended to live in the south of France for good.

Following the end of the war, Sibyl Colefax wrote in April 1947 to James Lees-Milne who was then working for the National Trust to say “I was over at Hidcote with Vivien Leigh Saturday. Laurie Johnston wants to give Hidcote to the N. T. now. So do get him tied up. You see he is not gaga but has no memory. He told me, indeed took me away specially to talk of this.” Read the rest of this entry »

100 years of Hidcote Manor Garden

Chipping Campden Bulletin by Adam 2 Comments »


It is one hundred years ago since Lawrence Johnston and his mother, Mrs Gertrude Winthrop, came to Hidcote Manor. On 22 June 1907. The Times advertised the Hidcote Manor estate, described as a valuable freehold farm comprising some 287 acres and 34 perches to-be sold by auction at the Noel Arms in Chipping Campden on Tuesday 2nd July 1907, with possession on 29th September 1907 – Michaelmas day, when most agricultural leases began and ended. The advertisement said that the farm would be sold together with the: very substantial and picturesque farm house, stone built, with, entrance hall, fine oak staircase, three sitting rooms, eight bedrooms, two box rooms, and usual offices, with lawns and large kitchen garden.

It went on to note that: the farm is particularly healthy, being situate on a spur of the Cotswolds at an elevation of from 500 to 800 feet above sea level and from it extensive views of the counties of Warwick, Worcester and Gloucester can be obtained. Meets of the Warwickshire, North Cotswold and Haythrop [sic] Hounds are within easy distance, and the partridge shooting on the estate is good. Read the rest of this entry »

Campden skies, June 2007

Campden Skies, Chipping Campden Bulletin by Adam 1 Comment »

This month the nights are short but are getting warm enough to look out at the sky. On 21st June at 7 pm (BST) is the moment of the summer solstice. After that the days shorten and the nights lengthen again. The planet Venus is still brightening and should be a splendid sight after sunset in the west. Mercury too will be bright low down in the western evening sky at the beginning of the month.

Last month I mentioned that I had visited the William Herschel telescope on La Palma. I hadn’t realised that it is the largest telescope in Europe – the Canary Islands are counted geographically as part of Europe. I have just read an article that lists all its most important discoveries since it began its work in 1989 when it recorded the very first feature on the surface of a distant star. It has been known for a long time that our Sun has spots but until a vast hot spot was found on the surface of giant Betelgeuse no one could be quite certain that other stars had such features too. Read the rest of this entry »

  • Google
  • Event Calendar

  • Upcoming Events

Subscribe to news from this site

Simply enter your email address:
Delivered by FeedBurner
RSS Feed Feed(RSS)

Visit our Cotswold bookstore for more Cotswold books and DVDs

Visit the our Cotswold bookstore for more Cotswold books and DVDs


Blog Directory links
  1. Add to Technorati Favorites
  2. Blogdigger Blog Search Engine
  3. Bloggapedia, Blog Directory - Find It!
  4. Travel Blogs - Blog Catalog Blog Directory
  5. Webo-Link Directory