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Campden Skies, July 2007

Campden Skies, Chipping Campden Bulletin by Adam No Comments »

Early this month in the twilight just after sunset look for Venus still bright in the west. Then look a little more and not far away you will find another object shining without twinkling. That will be the planet Saturn. Both will have disappeared into the sunset glow by the end of the month.

Planets appear to move amongst the fixed stars and so attracted the attention of the early civilisations. Saturn was named by the Romans for the father of the king of the gods, Jupiter. This planet was the most distant known to the ancients and travelled through the stars more slowly than any other planet they watched. Thus it seemed logical to name it for an elderly and presumably slow-moving god. The planet speeding fastest was called Mercury – the messenger of the gods whose sandals were winged. Venus is the brightest and most beautiful planet visible from Earth and not surprisingly was named for the goddess of beauty and love.

As you will see, Venus is far more brilliant than Saturn. Indeed you may not be able to make out the latter until the twilight begins to darken. Does this mean that Venus is bigger than Saturn? By no means – it is just an optical effect of distance. Just as a candle in your hand would seem brighter than a searchlight miles away so nearby but tiny Venus outshines gigantic but distant Saturn. Both shine by reflected sunlight.

Venus orbits the Sun inside the Earth’s orbit and so shows phases, like the Moon. At present it is crescent shaped and you may be able to see this with binoculars – after sunset. As the month progresses the planet will not appear any dimmer even though the illuminated portion will shrink day by day as it gets ever closer to the Sun. This is because it is coming closer to Earth and the disc is getting larger. For all its brilliance it is a little smaller than the Earth, another rocky planet and with complete cloud cover that reflects much of the sunlight. Its diameter is 12,104 km. (The equatorial diameter of the Earth is 12,756 km and the polar is 12,714 km.)

In between Earth and Saturn lie the orbits of Mars, the asteroids and Jupiter. It is a gas-giant very far away. At present it is on the opposite side of the Sun to us so its apparent closeness to Venus is just due to the effect of the line-of-sight. Its equatorial diameter is 120,000 km and the polar is 107,100 km. These figures do not include its rings which can only be seen though a telescope. In spite of its size, Saturn’s mass is not as much as might be expected. If an ocean large enough could be provided, Saturn would float! It is far enough from the Sun to travel at only a little under 10 km a second.

The strength of the pull of gravity falls off with distance and that means the closer to the Sun the faster an object must orbit to avoid falling in. Earth orbits at just under 30 km a second but Venus has to keep up fractionally over 35 km a second. Mercury travels at just under 48 km a second. No wonder that another name for mercury is quicksilver.

If you are a bit giddy at the thought of the speed you are travelling, add in the effect of the daily rotation that whizzes you round many thousands of miles every 24 hours and the motion of the Sun itself, dragging its collection of planets, orbiting the centre of the Galaxy; and we must not forget that the Galaxy itself is moving within its cluster of galaxies. That cluster of galaxies is no doubt heading somewhere but we’ll leave it there as I’m a little dizzy.

Jill Wilson
(From the Chipping Campden Bulletin. Included with kind permission of Jeremy Green)

Mabel Pearman’s Burford Browns – what another hen!

Features, Food and Produce by Tony No Comments »

Burford Browns in the grass Image (c) Clarence Court
A real Cotswold Hen with very special ox-blood dark brown eggs

This is another special Cotswold Hen. The name originates from Cotswold farmers Tom and Mabel Pearman who moved to Westhill, Burford during the early 1900′s. Mabel earned pin money from butter and from the special dark brown eggs from the hens which were her pride and joy.

Mabel kept her hens in the Rickyard at Manor Farm and they were free to roam on the grassy slopes overlooking Burford High Street.

Their eggs were very special with a chocolate coloured shell and large deep yellow yolks and a super flavour. With their thick dark brown shells they soon became known as Burford Browns.

Mabel Pearman was Philip Lee-Woolf’s grandmother and the origins of her birds have been passed down through the family until he has reintroduced the breed through the ethical egg producer he founded – Clarence Court. Three years ago Mr Lee-Woolf, bred the first Mabel Pearman’s Brown Burford in 50 years. The hens were difficult to breed because the gene for a chocolate-coloured egg is recessive, meaning it would be swamped by any genes for other colours. Only chickens with a particular heritage produce the eggs.

Another problem is that the blue-black hens lay just five eggs a week compared with up to 10 from the average modern hybrid.

Clarence Court are donating 2p to HEN Aid for every pack of Burford Brown eggs sold between now and End of September.

www.clarencecourt.co.uk

Farm Africa – making a lasting difference to Africa’s families.

Chipping Campden Music Festival

Chipping Campden Bulletin, Events, Noticeboard by Adam 1 Comment »

President Paul Lewis
Principal sponsor of the 2007 festival – Jackson Stops & Staff. Steinway piano sponsored by Cutts of Campden.

I am delighted to report that the 2007 festival was another great success. Ticket sales were well up on 2006 and although fees were also considerably higher than last year we have finished up with a surplus to carry forward to 2008. As always our performers seemed to love both the venue and the atmosphere the festival generates. The following are just some of the comments we received from this year’s artists:

“To play to such an enthusiastic and concentrated capacity crowd was quite a compliment and I am most grateful for all you did… my warmest gratitude for another totally enjoyable visit to your superb Festival – long may it last and prosper. You have turned it into a remarkable success story!” John Lill.

“I saw the orchestra today at their Colin Davis rehearsals, and they were all saying how much they enjoyed last night, and what a fabulous venue the church is! Charlotte also reported that you and your team were wonderfully helpful and hospitable. Many thanks for the invitation and for being so great to work with” Pauline Gilberton director English Chamber Orchestra.

“The best venue we have ever played in in the UK” Igor Naidfn – viola player of the Borodin quartet.

“Thanks so much again – the concert on Friday was fantastic and the orchestra were very glad to have a concert in such a beautiful setting, and much closer to home after five months of non-stop touring!” Tara Persaud concerts manager Academy of St Martin in the Fields.

I would like to thank everyone who became a ‘Patron’, ‘Friend’ or ‘Sponsor’ this year, without whose help the festival would not survive. There are too many to name everyone but the following deserve a particular mention; Jackson Stops & Staff for, once again, being our principal sponsor. Cutts of Campden for sponsoring the Steinway piano for the 6th year. Cotswold House Hotel for sponsoring, for the fourth year, the jazz supper.

I would also like to thank everyone who helped in any way with the day to day running of the event. Again there is not room to mention everyone but the following worked particularly hard; Richard Stephens, Ivor & Jean Owen, Arthur & Rachel Cunyghame, Micaela Schmitz, Jessica May. Finally thank you to Campden Bowling club and to W.R. Haines & Sons for allowing us to display the large advertising boards on their properties and Jeremy Green for all the advertising in his Bulletin. Next year’s festival will run from Tuesday 13th – Saturday 24th May. Details will be published in November 2007.

Before then we have two ‘one off concerts both in St. James’ church at 7.30pm The Coronation of Poppea Saturday September 22nd – tickets £10 adults £5 students – on the door only. A fully staged production of the opera with professional orchestra and advanced singers from the top UK colleges.

Paul Lewis Saturday Dec 1st 7.30pm. Beethoven’s last three piano sonatas op109/110/111. This will be the final time Paul plays this programme in the UK

Booking forms will be sent to everyone on the festival database in July. Box office opens August 1st.
(From the Chipping Campden Bulletin. included with kind permission of Jeremy Green)

Chipping Campden – Sequel to the Scuttlebrook wake verse

Chipping Campden Bulletin, Noticeboard by Adam No Comments »

1915

A sequel to our ’1915′ Scuttlebrook poem saga has emerged. Further anecdotal evidence suggests that Scuttlebrook Wake again came under threat soon after the opening of the recreation ground in 1934 and another Coldicott was involved. A ‘Save Scuttlebrook Wake in Leasbourne’ group ( of which Fred Coldicott was a member) sprang up following the town council’s insistence that all future celebrations, including Scuttlebrook, should take place in ‘their’ new field. The group organised their own ‘Leasbourne’ Scuttlebrook celebrations by putting up stalls, donkey rides and selling refreshments.

Tradition triumphed as Scuttlebrook retreated from the recreation ground to be unanimously celebrated the following year (1935) in Leasbourne. During WWII one stall was erected by Laurence Ladbrook to keep the charter intact and maintain the tradition.

Unfortunately the last line was missed from the poem in the last Bulletin, the last verse should have read

So just let our brave lads know at the front
And the kiddies they ‘ve left behind,
That good old Campden’s flag still flies
For the sake of “Ye Olden Times”!!

The Archive Room at the Old Police Station, Chipping Campden
(From the Chipping Campden Bulletin. included with kind permission of Jeremy Green)

 

Old Cotswold Legbar? What the heck is that?

Features, Food and Produce by Tony 1 Comment »

Old Cotswold Legbar, Picture (c) Clarence CourtFrom Patagonia to Stow-on-the-Wold – what a journey!

An “Old Cotswold Legbar” is a chicken. The hen lays her eggs in a variety of beautiful pastel colours including turquoise, blue, olive, pink, peach and eau-de-nil. The colours are perfectly natural and are akin to the eggs laid by many wild birds.

They are proud, striking birds with distinctive “crests” and the hawk-like eyes of their earlier Chilean relatives. They can be traced back to the 1920s. Botanist and explorer, Mr. Clarence Elliott from Stow-on-the Wold in the Cotswolds, who toured the world collecting rare plants and animals, set sail for home in 1927 from Patagonia and amongst the many animals on board his “Noahs Ark” were three Chilean Araucana hens and a cockerel. Disaster struck when the cockerel was killed accidently but the three hens survived the trip.

These hens were used at Cambridge University in genetic studies of poultry and by crossing these Araucana hens with White Leghorns and Gold Legbars, and over four generations, they produced the Cream Legbar.

Direct descendants of these Cambridge Legbars are now kept on farms in the Cotswolds and have been instrumental in the development of Clarence Court’s own bird – the Old Cotswold Legbar.

Clarence Court are donating 2p to HEN-Aid for every pack of Old Cotswold Legbar eggs sold until the end of September.

www.clarencecourt.co.uk

Stay for Bed and Breakfast at Little Gidding and you will be served a free range Old Cotswold Legbar egg (or eggs) from Ebrington Washbrook at the breakfast table and we can show you the blue egg shell as proof.(subject to their hens co-operating and providing enough eggs)

Time for Tea (lots of it) – 262 Cups and Saucers

Features, Places by Tony 1 Comment »

262 Cups and Saucers, Photo (c) Where I fell in Love GalleryUntil 31st July – The Cup and Saucer Exhibition – Where I fell in Love Gallery Shipston on Stour

Bruno Dauvin has invited potters and ceramists from around the world to send him one cup and saucer to create the biggest ever exhibition in the world. The cup and saucer must be hand-made from clay – not mass produced- and the piece does not have to functional.

So far he has on display and for sale 262 cups and saucers of all shapes, colours and sizes and from around the world.

Visitors to the exhibition can register (as well as buy) their favourite cup and saucer and the one with the highest vote will be awarded the “Where I fell in Love Gallery Best Cup and Saucer 2007 Award” and a cheque for £500.

The range of designs, styles and colours is amazing. Go and see for yourself.

www.whereifellinlovegallery.com

Where I Fell In Love Gallery
The Shambles
Market Place
Shipston on Stour
Warwickshire
CV36 4AG

Opening Hours Monday to Saturday 10.00 – 17.00

The premises on the Shambles was being run by Bruno as La Blainvillaise French restaurant when Fiona Hufton walked into Bruno’s life. She was working in an art gallery nearby and walked into the restaurant. He tried to impress her with his French culinary ary and his joie de vivre. It was here that they fell in love. They decided to close the restaurant and to create somewhere where their love of art, relaxed social atmosphere and passion for creativity would flourish.

The gallery opened it’s doors on Sunday 24th October 2004.

Ebrington needs help from St. Swithin

Features, Places by Tony No Comments »

Ebrington Floods 2Friday 20th July – Floods in Ebrington after a day of torrential rain

It rained and rained and rained all day.

It had also rained on St Swithin’s Day, Sunday 15th July and the rhyme says:-

St Swithin’s Day, if it does rain,
Full forty days, it will remain
St Swithin’s Day, if it be fair
For forty days, t’will rain no more.

On Friday I think that we got the full forty days of rain in the one day.
Ebrington Floods 1
Like most places in the Cotswolds and in both Worcestershire and Warwickshire the village was inundated with water. The drains and ditches could not cope, the roads rapidly became streams, the streams became lakes and the water just ran off the fields in torrents into the houses.

In spite of all the water damage, and some people have seen their properties damaged very badly, the British spirit rang true and all the travellers who could go no further, and there were many of them including families with small children and a pregnant lady, because all the local towns were cut off and all the local roads flooded, were accomodated locally.

Some have had to stay a second night as, because of the sheer volume of broken down cars in the area, the rescue services cannot get to them until Sunday.

Ebrington is no different to any other village and was certainly not as badly hit as some villages in the area, but in a time of stress everybody does pull together and look after those less fortunate.

So St.Swithin please do not send rain like that again – we have had our forty days.

St.Swithin was an early Saxon Bishop of Winchester and is buried in the Cathedral. It is said that he requested to be buried in a common graveyard, “where the rain would fall on him and the feet of ordinary men could pass over him.” His wishes were followed but then it was decided to move his body inside the Cathedral. When this was done there was a great storm.

Prayers to St. Swithin met with miraculous cures and he was canonized.

There is no evidence to support the “40 days” but the rhyme has stuck and become familiar.

The amazing Maize Maze is ready again

Events, Features, Food and Produce, Places by Tony No Comments »

Maize Maze (c) John RightonJuly 21st – Hidcote Manor Farm Maize Maze opens – until September 9th

This year’s theme is “magical” and the maze is in the shape of a giant Cotswold wizard over 200 metres tall.

This maze was designed by the world’s leading maze designer Adrian Fisher who has been designing and creating puzzle mazes for 21 years. Adrian’s designs have been created in over 30 countries and have won 6 Guinness world records.

The Hidcote maze is cut into a field of fodder maize and interspersed with over 50,000 sunflowers. Bridges and Observation Towers offer a magic sight and scenic views across the Vale of Evesham and to the Malvern Hills.

The giant wizard is over eight acres in size with more than four miles of paths and the whole maze is then chopped down in mid-september and made into silage for the farm’s cattle.
Aerial view of the Hidcote Maize Maze. Photo (c) John Righton
The Maze is open daily from 10.00 am to 6.00 pm.

Entrance: Adults £4.75, Children £3.75, Family £15.00 (2 adults + 2 children)

www.hidcotemaze.co.uk

Hidcote Manor Farm, Hidcote Bartrim, Chipping Campden, Gloucestershire GL55 6LP
A great way to get lost in the countryside.

The Harry Potter Cotswold connection

Features, Places by Adam No Comments »

Gloucester Cathedral Cloisters - photo credit Nina Aldin ThuneGloucester Cathedral has been a place of worship for over 1,300 years since 678 when a religious community was founded by Osric with his sister Kyneburga as the first Abbess. The cathedral is recognised for its Gothic architecture and the cloisters with fan vaulting are regarded as one of the best architectural features.

Since 2000 the cathedral has been used for filming the first two Harry Potter films and the cloisters feature in several scenes including the Troll scene in Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone in the USA). Pupils from King’s School, next to the cathedral, were used as extras.

For Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, the cloisters and surrounding areas were used for filming the Gryffindor house secret entrance. The Chapter House was also used for the dormitory room, Moaning Myrtle, talking paintings, ghost scenes and the red writing on the wall scene were also filmed at the Cathedral.

The Harry Potter Cotswold connection continues as JK Rowling was born in the Cotswold market town of Chipping Sodbury in 1965. Chipping Sodbury lies in southern Gloucestershire 8 miles north west of Bristol and has a long market square, or “Chepynge”, as it was known in medieval times – which then became the name “Chipping”.

As another piece of trivia, Chipping Sodbury is believed to have inspired “Effing Sodbury”, a place name associated with the satirical paper The Framley Examiner.

An Eggcellent idea – Live Aid has hatched Hen Aid

Features, Food and Produce by Tony 1 Comment »

Clarence CourtBuy Clarence Court Eggs and Help Raise Money for Farmers in Africa

Clarence Court has championed ethical egg production since it was founded seventeen years ago by Cotswold farmer Philip Lee-Woolf and he has pioneered the revival of pure breed bloodlines which, unlike modern hybrids, are bred for egg quality and not quantity.
Farm Africa
Last year he distributed radios to all his producer farms because music relaxes chickens and happy hens lay better eggs.

Philip was anxious to do more and to mark the 22nd anniversary of Live Aid, the multi-venue rock concert for famine relief, Clarence Court has joined forces with FARM-Africa to raise money for its chicken projects in pastoral communities in Eastern and South Africa.

500,000 charity packs of Old Cotswold Legbar and Burford Browns eggs will go on sale from 13th July until the end of September and for every pack sold Clarence Court will donate 2 pence per pack, with the aim of raising more than £10,000.

This donation will help change the lives of marginal chicken farmers by educating them about how to manage their natural resources more effectively and build sustainable livelihoods on their land.
Clarence Court Eggs
The Clarence Court charity egg boxes will be stocked in Waitrose, Sainsbury’s, Booth’s, Fortnum & Mason, Harrods and selected Asda stores.

FARM-Africa is an international non-government organisation that aims to reduce poverty in Eastern and South Africa and has projects in Ethiopia, Kenya, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda and Southern Sudan.

www.clarencecourt.co.uk
www.farmafrica.org.uk

charlotte.Hutley@thespaway.com

So come on, eat an extra egg for breakfast and help Hen-Aid to achieve it’s target.

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