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The Cotswold Way marker stone at Campden square

Chipping Campden Bulletin, Noticeboard by Adam No Comments »

(From the noticeboard section of the Chipping Campden Bulletin. Reproduced with kind permission of Jeremy Green)

Very recently the town council was asked about the above stone and, as they had little or no information, they asked around. I was able to fill the gap and below I set out what I know of its history.

It starts at the Cotstone Quarry, which was worked out and was just a large hole in the ground. I believe that it was owned by an Irishman named Macateer, who was in financial difficulty and fled to Ireland to escape his creditors. In the early 1980s Eric Raines, who was and still is a well-known local farmer, went to Ireland and arranged to purchase the quarry.

On his return he applied for planning consent to use the quarry for landfill and was granted permission for only clean soil and for hardcore to be dumped. At this time the M42 was under construction and there were literally tons of surplus soil. Cotstone was the nearest site and hundreds of loads of soil were dumped there.

All this coincided with Campden being flooded on two occasions and therefore a new drainage system was being put in. One section dealt with the eastern end of the town and another the west end. The former meant removing the old stone culvert in Leysbourne, which had collapsed. It was constructed of ‘cut’ stone which is very valuable. To get rid of this the contractors decided to dump it in Cotstone Quarry, paying Eric Haines a fee for each load. Eric told the contractors to leave the stone on the top of the quarry and each evening he, with an employee, collected the stone and removed it to his farm, which was then in Blind Lane.

Subsequently he asked me to meet him in Blind Lane where he proudly showed me the stone he had salvaged. He offered me a piece for a Cotswold Way marker in the Square. The Cotswold Wardens picked it up the next day and erected it where it stands today. They had the ‘Bath 100m,’ cut into it and as this became a traffic sign, it was exempt from planning consent. The little plaque, which reads ‘Cotswold Way, the beginning and end was supplied by the then head warden Ted Fryer, the cost being borne by the Gloucestershire county council.

Just as a matter of interest, the Cotswold Way was the brainchild of Tony Drake a prominent rambler, who for over thirty years was an influential campaigner for the footpath network of Gloucestershire. The Cotswold Way was launched in 1970 and the beginning of the Way was at the Square. Persons who suggest it should be at St James’s church are completely wrong.

Reg Martin. (He was chairman of the north district Cotswold Wardens from the late 1970s until the early 1990s.) Campden and district historical and archaeological society.

www.chippingcampdenhistory.org.uk

Campden and District music society with a Russian Connection

Chipping Campden Bulletin, Noticeboard by Adam 1 Comment »

The Campden and District Music Society launches its 47th season on Tuesday 9th October 2007 with a concert by the Fitzwilliam string quartet. Lucy Russell, Jonathan Sparey, Alan George and Andrew Skidmore founded the group in 1968 when they were Cambridge undergraduates and became well known through their close association with Dmitry Shostakovich, who entrusted them with the Western premieres of his last three quartets. With a busy concert programme across the world, many recordings and international awards, Campden Music Society is delighted to have them launch their concert series. They will be joined by another well known musician, the principal cellist of the London Symphony Orchestra, Moray Welsh, whom some will have seen at the Campden music festival in May. Moray studied cello under Rostropovich at the Moscow Conservatoire and has enjoyed a long music career of solo performances, recordings and teaching at the Royal Northern College of Music for 18 years.

The concert opens with a short work, “More Fools than Wise” by Jonathan Rathbone who was musical director and arranger for the Swingle Singers for twelve years. It is inspired by the words and music of the seventeenth century composer Orlando Gibbons’s madrigal “The Silver Swan”, which tells how a swan, having been silent all her life, reportedly sings most beautifully just before she dies. The title comes from the last line – “More geese than swans now live, more fools than wise.” – a line particularly important to Rathbone, as it expresses a dilemma in music today. Borodin’s 2nd string quartet in D, written between 1881 and his death in 1887 is one of the most beloved works in the entire quartet literature. Written on a summer holiday and dedicated to his wife, this tuneful work exudes contentment. Some of its glorious melodies were made even more popular over sixty years later as songs in the Broadway musical “Kismet”. The concert ends with the string quintet D.956 in C major of Schubert, written in 1828 with two cellos, just one of many astonishing compositions dating from the composer’s final months. Every moment in this, his last and greatest chamber work, completed only seven weeks before his death, is magnificent in its tragic beauty.

This not-to-be-missed concert takes place in Chipping Campden School Hall, Cider Mill Lane. Chipping Campden at 8pm on Tuesday 9th October. With an annual membership subscription of £40, members have free access to the season’s five concerts and may introduce a guest. Members also have opportunities to join group visits to ballet, operas and concerts at different venues and bookings for these have now opened. New members (£40 for five concerts, i.e. ONLY £8 PER CONCERT) are warmly welcomed. To ensure that you receive full details of membership, contact Campden Music Society, c/o Treasurer, Saxfeld, Hoo Lane, Chipping Campden, GL55 6AZ or phone 01386 841520.

The Society thanks its commercial sponsors: Cutts of Campden, Cotswold House Hotel, Martin Gotrel, Andrew Greenwood, Robert Welch, Mark Annett Estate Agents and Graphic Print Partnership.

(From the Chipping Campden Bulletin. included with kind permission of Jeremy Green)

Another successful Campden flower festival

Chipping Campden Bulletin, Letters by Adam 1 Comment »

(From the letters section of the Chipping Campden Bulletin. Reproduced with kind permission of Jeremy Green)

Dear Jeremy,

Another wonderful flower festival is over and now many of us are reflecting on the very successful weekend it was. In our tea rooms we had a really happy five days serving lunches and teas to over 1,000 people, but none of that could have happened without our enormous band of helpers: firstly, all the kind people who donated the food (over 100 cakes) and also the non-food items; and then the large number of friends who worked in shifts in the kitchen. The stars of the tea room “staff were the children. They behaved beautifully and were polite and helpful to our customers, especially the elderly and disabled, and we all enjoyed their cheerful company. So a very big thank you to Maricon, Olivia, Tyler, Theo, Felix, Ellie, Daisy, Alexander, Kelly, Sidney, Hamish, Serena and Rosanna.

Last but certainly not least I want to give a huge thank you to my “Stalwarts” – Jenny, Carol and Avril. They worked so hard but together we had such a fun and happy weekend. Thank you to you all.

Yours sincerely,
Jessica Brook

Also, see our other Flower Festival article here.

Campden and District music society’s 47th season

Chipping Campden Bulletin, Events, Noticeboard by Adam No Comments »

The Campden and District Music Society’s 47th season will start with a concert on Tuesday 9th October 2007 with the Fitzwilliam string quartet and Moray Welsh, cello. They will play music by Borodin and Schubert.

On Tuesday 13th November 2007 Thomas Barber, oboe and James Southall, piano will give the recital, sponsored by the Countess of Munster Musical Trust, which supports exciting new young artists.

The Feinstein Ensemble will launch 2008 with a concert on Tuesday 8th January using both modern and period instruments, flute, recorder, harpsichord and strings with music by Bach and Vivaldi.

On Tuesday 5th February 2008 the Kandinsky piano trio will play music by Haydn, Schumann and Beethoven.

The final concert of the season on Tuesday 18th March 2008 is the Wakeford Ensemble Septet, seven players with harp, string quartet, flute and clarinet and music by Mozart, Debussy, Skempton, Saint-Saens and Ravel.

All concerts take place in Chipping Campden School Hall, Cider Mill Lane, Chipping Campden at 8pm. Members also have opportunities to join group visits to ballet, operas and concerts at different venues. Bookings for these will open very soon, so your membership is necessary to participate and attend concerts. New members are welcomed.

Campden and District Music Society Website

(From the Chipping Campden Bulletin. Included with kind permission of Jeremy Green)

Life in the 1500s

Chipping Campden Bulletin by Adam No Comments »

A taste of life in England during the 1500s by Roger Keight, Campden and district historical and archaeological society.

Most people got married in June because they took their yearly bath in May, and still smelled pretty good by June. They were starting to smell, however, so brides carried a bouquet of flowers to hide the body odour. Hence the custom of carrying a bouquet when getting married.

Baths consisted of a big tub filled with hot water. The man of the house had the privilege of the nice clean water, then all the other sons and men, then the women and finally the children, with last of all the babies. By then the water was so dirty you could actually lose someone in it. Hence the saying, “Don’t throw the baby out with the bath water”.

Houses had thatched roofs, thick straw piled high, with no wood underneath. It was the only place for animals to get warm, so all the cats and other small animals (mice and bugs) lived in the roof. When it rained it became slippery and sometimes the animals would slip and fall off the roof. Hence the saying, “It’s raining cats and dogs”.

There was nothing to stop things from falling into the house from the roof. This posed a real problem in the bedroom where bugs and other droppings could mess up your nice clean bed. Hence, a bed with big posts and a sheet hung over the top afforded some protection. That’s how canopy beds came into existence.

The floor was dirt. Only the wealthy had something other than dirt. Hence the saying, “Dirt poor”. The wealthy had slate floors which would get slippery in the winter when wet, so they spread thresh (straw) on the floor to help keep their footing. As the winter wore on, they added more thresh until, when you opened the door, it would all start slipping outside. A piece of wood was placed in the entrance way. Hence the thresh hold.

In those old days, they cooked in the kitchen with a big kettle that always hung over the fire. Every day they lit the fire and added things to the pot. They ate mostly vegetables and did not get much meat. They would eat the stew for dinner, leaving leftovers in the pot to go cold overnight and then start again the next day. Sometimes the stew had food in it that had been there for quite a while. Hence the rhyme, “Peas porridge hot, peas porridge cold, peas porridge in the pot nine days old”.

Sometimes they would obtain pork, which made them feel quite special. When visitors came, they would hang up their bacon to show off. It was a sign of wealth that a man could, “bring home the bacon”. They would cut off a little to share with guests and would all sit round the table and, “chew the fat”.

Those with money had pewter plates. Food with high acid content caused some of the lead to leach on to the food, causing lead poisoning death. This happened most often with tomatoes, so for the next four hundred years or so, tomatoes were considered poisonous.

Bread was divided according to status. Workers got the burnt bottom of the loaf, the family got the middle and guests got the top or the ‘upper crust’.

Lead cups were used to drink ale or whisky. The combination would sometimes knock the imbibers out for a couple of days. Someone walking along the road would take them for dead and prepare them for burial. They were laid out on the kitchen table for a couple of days and the family would gather round, eat and drink and wait to see if they would wake up. Hence the custom of holding a wake.

England is old and small and local folks started running out of places to bury people. So they would dig up coffins and would take the bones to a bone house, and re-use the grave. When re-opening these coffins, one out of twenty-five were found to have scratch marks on the inside and they realized they had been burying people alive. So they would tie a string on the wrist of the corpse, lead it through the coffin and up through the ground and tie it to a bell. Someone would have to sit out in the graveyard all night (the graveyard shift) to listen for the bell; thus, someone could be “saved by the bell” or was considered a “dead ringer”.

Roger Keight. Campden and district historical and archaeological society.
If you are interested in joining CADHAS or want to find out more information, you can visit the Chipping Campden History website.

(From the Chipping Campden Bulletin. Included with kind permission of Jeremy Green)

Chipping Campden Cart Wash restoration

Features, Places by Tony No Comments »

Chipping Campden Cart Wash Photo (c) Tony Boyse

The historic Cart Wash in Chipping Campden could be restored

The Cart Wash, which dates back to 1832, was built after the vicar objected to carts being washed in the Scuttle Brook,which also provided drinking water to the inhabitants of Chipping Campden.

It is situated opposite the Almshouses and next to the Court Barn Museum and is seen by most people who visit the St. James’ Church.

The Wash is a stone built regular oval(ellipse) in the ground with stone walls on either side with a drain in the middle.

It is hoped that a grant can be obtained to restore the Cart Wash and an initial survey has estimated the cost to be £5000.

Chipping Campden 1914-18, Appeal for information

Chipping Campden Bulletin, Noticeboard by Adam No Comments »

The text for the book is virtually finished and at the present moment there are 460 people with entries in the book. Throughout the six weeks school holiday I will be inserting the photographs into the text and laying out all of the pages. I would like to take this opportunity to thank the people of Campden and the relatives of the people in the book for being so helpful over the last few years. I hope that the book will be a fitting tribute to the people from Campden who served during the Great War.

I am making one last plea for help on the following men: Edward Brooks. Charles Burnett. Reginald Cairns. Arthur William Cherry. John Codrington. William Haylock. Arthur Jones. Percy Lane. H.B. Lewis. Jack Midgley. Cyril Sheadman. Julian Simpson. Frederick Smith (I have two but I need three different Frederick Smith’s.) William Smith (I have one but I need two different William Smith’s.) John Smith. Frank Thorne. E.E. West. Thomas Wheeler.

I have searched church records, census returns and the Evesham Journal. Any help, no matter how small would really be appreciated.

Paul Hughes

If you can help with any information, please add a comment to this article or contact us at info@ebrington.com and we will pass on your message to Paul.

(From the Chipping Campden Bulletin. Included with kind permission of Jeremy Green)

Chipping Campden floods – letters of thanks

Chipping Campden Bulletin, Letters by Adam No Comments »

Dear Jeremy

The flash floods that hit Chipping Campden and the surrounding areas last Friday may have caused less devastation than the rivers that burst their banks in other parts of the country, but anyone who has been in any way affected by similar natural occurrences will understand how traumatic it can be to find your home and belongings badly damaged, if not quite wrecked.

So we would like to pay a little tribute through your pages to all the good friends, neighbours and kind souls who came rushing to help us when we were so greatly in need: Maralyn and Bill from Paxford, Anne and Ken from Mickleton, Pearl and John from up the road, Geraldine and Tony from across the road who had their own damage to attend to, Maureen who brought food and drink for everybody and stayed cleaning the whole day and Phil the Minister from the Baptist Church, who not only brought words of comfort but got himself thoroughly filthy carrying furniture and ruined possessions from the house to the road, from where everything was speedily removed in countless journeys by Graham and Conrad. Read the rest of this entry »

100 Years of Hidcote Manor Gardens – Restoring the garden to its heyday

Chipping Campden Bulletin, Noticeboard, Places by Adam No Comments »


Following on from July’s article…

After Lawrence Johnston’s death on 27 April 1958, the National Trust sought to let the manor house in order to raise some funds to help to maintain Hidcote Manor garden and had a freer hand to manage the garden. The furnishings in the house had already been sold at a sale at the property in late 1956 and then work was done to bring the house into a suitable state for letting.

Several prospective tenants were interviewed in September 1958 by the secretary of the National Trust. This resulted in a fourteen year tenancy at a rental of £250 a year being offered to Sir Gawain Bell who accepted it and undertook to furnish Hidcote as soon as possible. His intention was to make Hidcote his home when he retired from the Foreign Office in 1960.

It was evident in these early years that the National Trust had an annual deficit of some £1,000 to £2,000 each year in the running of Hidcote and this shortfall had to be found from the gardens fund. Consequently, when structures in the garden, such as the plant house by the lily pond, fell into disrepair consideration was given to whether to repair or demolish it. Although it was initially decided to repair it, the lack of funds led to a decision to demolish it. Sir Edward Salisbury, director of Kew, visited to identify which plants should be retained in a smaller plant shelter elsewhere in the garden. Read the rest of this entry »

Campden Skies, July 2007

Campden Skies, Chipping Campden Bulletin by Adam No Comments »

Early this month in the twilight just after sunset look for Venus still bright in the west. Then look a little more and not far away you will find another object shining without twinkling. That will be the planet Saturn. Both will have disappeared into the sunset glow by the end of the month.

Planets appear to move amongst the fixed stars and so attracted the attention of the early civilisations. Saturn was named by the Romans for the father of the king of the gods, Jupiter. This planet was the most distant known to the ancients and travelled through the stars more slowly than any other planet they watched. Thus it seemed logical to name it for an elderly and presumably slow-moving god. The planet speeding fastest was called Mercury – the messenger of the gods whose sandals were winged. Venus is the brightest and most beautiful planet visible from Earth and not surprisingly was named for the goddess of beauty and love.

As you will see, Venus is far more brilliant than Saturn. Indeed you may not be able to make out the latter until the twilight begins to darken. Does this mean that Venus is bigger than Saturn? By no means – it is just an optical effect of distance. Just as a candle in your hand would seem brighter than a searchlight miles away so nearby but tiny Venus outshines gigantic but distant Saturn. Both shine by reflected sunlight.

Venus orbits the Sun inside the Earth’s orbit and so shows phases, like the Moon. At present it is crescent shaped and you may be able to see this with binoculars – after sunset. As the month progresses the planet will not appear any dimmer even though the illuminated portion will shrink day by day as it gets ever closer to the Sun. This is because it is coming closer to Earth and the disc is getting larger. For all its brilliance it is a little smaller than the Earth, another rocky planet and with complete cloud cover that reflects much of the sunlight. Its diameter is 12,104 km. (The equatorial diameter of the Earth is 12,756 km and the polar is 12,714 km.)

In between Earth and Saturn lie the orbits of Mars, the asteroids and Jupiter. It is a gas-giant very far away. At present it is on the opposite side of the Sun to us so its apparent closeness to Venus is just due to the effect of the line-of-sight. Its equatorial diameter is 120,000 km and the polar is 107,100 km. These figures do not include its rings which can only be seen though a telescope. In spite of its size, Saturn’s mass is not as much as might be expected. If an ocean large enough could be provided, Saturn would float! It is far enough from the Sun to travel at only a little under 10 km a second.

The strength of the pull of gravity falls off with distance and that means the closer to the Sun the faster an object must orbit to avoid falling in. Earth orbits at just under 30 km a second but Venus has to keep up fractionally over 35 km a second. Mercury travels at just under 48 km a second. No wonder that another name for mercury is quicksilver.

If you are a bit giddy at the thought of the speed you are travelling, add in the effect of the daily rotation that whizzes you round many thousands of miles every 24 hours and the motion of the Sun itself, dragging its collection of planets, orbiting the centre of the Galaxy; and we must not forget that the Galaxy itself is moving within its cluster of galaxies. That cluster of galaxies is no doubt heading somewhere but we’ll leave it there as I’m a little dizzy.

Jill Wilson
(From the Chipping Campden Bulletin. Included with kind permission of Jeremy Green)

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