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Gloucestershire gets revealed!

Events, Features by Adam No Comments »

On Thursday 6th March Gloucestershire County Council’s Archives Department and partners are launching ‘Gloucestershire Revealed’, the ultimate guide to museums, galleries and heritage in the county. To celebrate, a launch reception is taking place at Berkeley Castle.
Read the rest of this entry »

A brief history of underwear at Museum talk

Events, Features, Places by Adam No Comments »

Discover underwear through the ages when local costume expert Shelagh Lovett Turner comes to the Corinium Museum for an afternoon talk.

‘The Allure of the Unseen’, an informal ‘talk with tea’, will take place at the Park Street Museum on February 21st, where visitors can discover more about the range and styles of underwear worn through time.

There will also be the chance to see some historic underwear from Shelagh’s own stunning costume collection, as she will illustrate her talk with some fascinating underwear examples. These will include petticoats and pantaloons, the pure silk of the 1930s and the man-made fabrics of the 1950s and 60s.

The talk will be followed by plenty of time for questions and an informal chat with Shelagh over tea, coffee and cake.

‘The Allure of the Unseen’ runs from 2pm – 3pm and tickets cost £3 per person – booking is essential to avoid disappointment.

For more details, to find out about other Museum events, or to book tickets, please telephone the Corinium Museum on 01285 655611 or email museums@cotswold.gov.uk

Source: Cotswold District Council

Related Articles:
Historic shoes and footwear fairytales at the Corinium museum

Half-term history fun at Corinium Museum

Events, Features, Places by Adam No Comments »

Have a sneaky peek at anything from history and hairy beasts to shiny shoes this half term when the Corinium Museum hosts a range of fun events for children.

The Park Street museum will hold historical sessions from February 18th-22nd, which will shed light on the Stone Age, the Romans and the Tudors, while another hands-on event for youngsters is all about ‘Sparkly Shoes’.

The first activity to take place during the school break is part of the Museum’s ‘Archaeology Seminars’, and will look at the Romans in the Cotswolds.  It is aimed at 9-12 year olds and will allow children an up-close look at Roman artefacts.  This event is being held on Wednesday February 20th, from 10am-11.30am.

Also on February 20th is a ‘Sparkly Shoes’ activity, where children can create their own glittery and street-wise shoes, while drawing inspiration from the Museum’s current ‘Cinderella Shoes’ exhibition.  This will run from 1pm-3pm and costs £1 per child.  Each child must be accompanied by an adult.

Two more events will follow on Thursday February 21st, with ‘Wonderful Woolly Mammoths’ (10.30am-12pm) aimed at the 7-11 year old age bracket.  In this activity, children will look at the unique, elephant-like animals who roamed the world during the Stone Age, and they will be able to create their own Mammoth model.

The ‘Tudor Life’ family event, also on Thursday February 21st, will examine how the Tudors lived, and parents and children will look at costumes and artefacts, as well Tudor etiquette and dancing.  Visitors will also get the chance to make a Tudor pomander and hat to take home.  This session runs from 2.30pm-4pm.

For more information on any of these events, including admission prices and availability, please ring the Corinium Museum on 01285 655611 or email museums@cotswold.gov.uk

Source: Cotswold District Council 

Medieval monarch talks to take place in Stow

Events, Features, Places by Adam No Comments »

King Edward II, Source: WikipediaThe life and legend of controversial English monarch King Edward II will be the subject of a series of afternoon lectures in Stow in the Wold next month.

Local historian Tim Porter will visit Stow Library, in St Edwards Hall, The Square, for a trio of talks in February, under the banner of ‘The Life and Times of ’. The three talks will provide a fascinating glimpse into the world of the strangest, most contrary and controversial ruler that England has ever produced

Edward II was the first English prince to hold the title ‘Prince of Wales’ after being born at Caernarfon Castle in 1284, and after succeeding his father Edward I in 1308, he pursued a military campaign against the Scots. He was ultimately defeated at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314 and later died at Gloucestershire’s Berkeley Castle in 1327. His tomb can be found at Gloucester Cathedral.

The first lecture, ‘Young Edward and his Father’ takes place on Monday February 4th, while the second talk, ‘The King’s Friends and Foes’, is held on Monday February 11th. The final lecture in the series is called ‘Tyranny and Downfall’ and is hosted on Monday February 18th. All three lectures run from 2pm-4pm.

Tickets cost £6.50 per talk, with a 10% discount for annual season ticket holders and Friends of the Corinium Museum. Booking is essential.

For more details or to book, please contact Stow-on-the-Wold Library, St Edwards Hall, Stow-on-the-Wold, on 01451 830352.

Source: Cotswold District Council

Image of King Edward II from Wikimedia Commons freely licensed media file repository.

The life of literature legend at Museum talks

Events, Features by Adam No Comments »

Discover a fascinating insight into 14th Century England and its colourful characters when the Corinium Museum hosts two lectures in January. 

Both lectures will focus on the life and times of Geoffrey Chaucer, a renowned author and poet in medieval Britain, in an era of British history which saw literature and architecture flourish.  ‘The Age of Chaucer’ lectures will be hosted by local historian Tim Porter. 

The first lecture, on January 24th, is called ‘Chaucer and His Favoured Friends’, while the event on January 31st is called ‘Regional Celebrities’.  Both lectures run from 2pm – 4pm. 

The lectures will then link to a day school called ‘The Downfall of Richard II’ on Saturday February 9th.  This event, from 10am-4pm, tells how Cirencester came into the national spotlight in 1400 after Richard II’s last supporters were arrested by townspeople.

Tickets for the two lectures cost £6.50 per talk, with a 10% discount for season ticket holders and Friends of the Corinium Museum.  Tickets for the day school cost £25 per person (including tea, coffee and biscuits) and booking is essential.  Lunch is not included. 

For more details on either event or to book, please contact the Corinium Museum on 01285 655611 or email: museums@cotswold.gov.uk

Source: Cotswold District Council

Other Corinium Museum articles:

Historic shoes and footwear fairytales at the Corinium museum
Classic pottery comes to Corinium Museum

Hear local expert talk about historic houses

Events, Places by Adam No Comments »

Chipping Campden Almshouses. Photo (c) Rick http://ligthelm.multiply.comJoin local historian John Loosley at Cirencester’s Corinium Museum later this month when he hosts a talk on the historic almshouses of Gloucestershire.

The evening talk takes places at the Park Street venue on Thursday January 31st, and will focus on Gloucestershire’s many interesting almshouses, which date from the 12th century through to Victorian times.

John Loosley will explore the origins of these almshouses, the people who founded them and the rules and regulations the almspeople had to obey. Many of the almshouses – some of which are still in use today – are particularly fine architectural examples of their period.

‘Gloucestershire’s Almshouses’ is part of a series of evening lectures taking place at the Corinium Museum. It runs from 7pm–9pm, although finish times may vary because of time for questions.

Booking is essential and tickets for the event cost £5. Annual season ticket holders and Friends of the Corinium Museum receive a 10% discount.

Please contact Helen Arbon at the Corinium Museum on 01285 655611 or email museums@cotswold.gov.uk to book a place or to find out about other events.

Photo: (c) Rick, http://ligthelm.multiply.com

Source: Cotswold District Council

Other Corinium Museum articles:
Master mosaic making at Corinium Museum session
Classic pottery comes to Corinium Museum
Hands-on history sessions over half-term at the Corinium Museum
Make Bronze Age jewellery at Museum session

Historic shoes and footwear fairytales at the Corinium museum

Events, Features, Places by Adam 2 Comments »

A month-long exhibition which looks at historic shoes and footwear fairytales will open at the Corinium Museum, Cirencester on Sunday January 20th.

‘Cinderella Shoes’ will showcase 200-year-old silk shoes with gorgeous gold-coloured buckles; huge protective boots from Victorian times; funky and chunky Seventies platform shoes and tiny baby bootees from 1900.

The fabulous footwear comes from the Museum’s own collection and that of local collector Shelagh Lovett-Turner.

Alongside the exhibits are big, shoe-inspired collages made by children from Acorns Day Nursery, Bright Eyes Children’s Centre, Cirencester Opportunity Group and Stepping Stones Nursery.

The toddlers all met the Museum’s Education Officer Rachael Holtom, who showed them some of the old shoes, played shoe-inspired games with them and told a story that involved shoes. The children then created their own artwork inspired by shoes and shoe stories.

Rachael said: “There are quite a few stories and rhymes that involve shoes – ‘The Elves and the Shoemaker’, ‘Puss in Boots’, ‘One, Two, Buckle My Shoe’ and so on.

“The children have all produced fantastic artwork and really enjoyed looking at the old shoes and the shoe activities that their nurseries organised.”

The footwear on display is grouped into fairytale themes, under the story headings. There will also be hands-on activities for small children, such as decorating a shoe outline with buttons and buckles, shoes to try on and a chance to measure their own feet .

For adults, there are also ‘lucky charm’ shoes to look at, which were hidden under floors in the past in an attempt to stop witches entering homes. Visitors can also find out how the humble boot played a part in female emancipation, why shoes were not always made to fit the left and right foot and see a small selection of cobbler’s tools.

The exhibition runs from Sunday January 20th to Sunday 24th February and entrance costs £1. For opening times and more information, please phone 01285 655611.

Source: Cotswold District Council

A history of the Court Barn, Chipping Campden

Chipping Campden Bulletin, Noticeboard by Adam 1 Comment »

(From the noticeboard section of the Chipping Campden Bulletin. Reproduced with kind permission of Jeremy Green)
Court Barn Museum, Photo (c) Alan Crawford
Readers will be aware that Court Barn in Church Street has been renovated by the Guild of Handicraft Trust and has been transformed whilst still retaining its present external appearance. It is the site of an exhibition, meeting room and study centre celebrating the craftsmen who have lived in Campden and surrounding towns and villages since the beginning of the last century. There will be exhibits devoted to C R Ashbee and his Guild of Handicraft, to FL.Griggs, Alec Miller, Paul Woodroffe, the Harts and Robert Welch; and to others, like Gordon Russell and Katharine Adams from Broadway and the potters Michael Cardew and Ray Finch from Winchcombe.

This article, however, is about the barn itself. It stands on the edge of the grounds of Old Campden House and was built about 300 years ago. How ever did it come to intrude into the gardens of that magnificent house? After Sir Baptist Hicks’s new manor house was burned to the ground in 1645, its grounds and gardens and yards were gradually turned over to agricultural use. There is a deed dated 1691 by which the Hon. Susanna Noel, the mother of the six year old 3rd Earl of Gainsborough, leased it to Mary Rutter, a widow. Read the rest of this entry »

Chipping Campden and Charringworth – Sale of Lordships of the Manor

Events, Features, Places by Tony No Comments »

Thursday 15th November 14.00 – Auction in London of these two Lordships of the Manor

Lordships of the Manor are among the oldest titles in England and pre-date the Norman Conquest, begun by William I at the Battle of Hastings in 1066.

The Manor was the pivot of the Feudal System and by the reign of Edward the Confessor(1042-66) the Lord of the Manor was the most important person in village affairs. The Domesday Book compiled in 1086 listed 13,418 Manors and their owners. In return for his protection and the land he gave them, the people on the Manor owed their Lord services ranging from money rents to working so many days a week on the Lord’s “home farm” or demesne without pay.

The Lordships of the Manors of Chipping Campden and of Charringworth are being put up for sale on the instructions of the 5th Earl of Gainsborough. They have been in his family since the late 16th Century. The Lordship of Chipping Campden (Lot 16) is estimated to attract bids of between £10,000 and £12,500 and Charringworth (Lot 11)  between £5000 and £7000. Both Lordships of the Manor can be traced back to the Doomsday Book.

These two Lordships are included in an auction of 23 Lordships of the Manor, also including Diddington, Warwickshire (Lot 2) and Sheriff’s Lench Worcestershire (Lot 18) , which is being held by Manorial Auctioneers Ltd who are part of The Manorial Society of Great Britain.

The Auction is being held on Thursday 15th November 2007 at 2.00 pm at
Manorial Auctioneers Limited
Stationers’ Hall
Ave Maria Lane
Ludgate Hill
London EC4M 7DD

Manorial Auctioneers Limited
104 Kennington Road
London SE11 6RE
Telephone 020 7582 1588
www.msgb.co.uk

The Cotswold Way marker stone at Campden square

Chipping Campden Bulletin, Noticeboard by Adam No Comments »

(From the noticeboard section of the Chipping Campden Bulletin. Reproduced with kind permission of Jeremy Green)

Very recently the town council was asked about the above stone and, as they had little or no information, they asked around. I was able to fill the gap and below I set out what I know of its history.

It starts at the Cotstone Quarry, which was worked out and was just a large hole in the ground. I believe that it was owned by an Irishman named Macateer, who was in financial difficulty and fled to Ireland to escape his creditors. In the early 1980s Eric Raines, who was and still is a well-known local farmer, went to Ireland and arranged to purchase the quarry.

On his return he applied for planning consent to use the quarry for landfill and was granted permission for only clean soil and for hardcore to be dumped. At this time the M42 was under construction and there were literally tons of surplus soil. Cotstone was the nearest site and hundreds of loads of soil were dumped there.

All this coincided with Campden being flooded on two occasions and therefore a new drainage system was being put in. One section dealt with the eastern end of the town and another the west end. The former meant removing the old stone culvert in Leysbourne, which had collapsed. It was constructed of ‘cut’ stone which is very valuable. To get rid of this the contractors decided to dump it in Cotstone Quarry, paying Eric Haines a fee for each load. Eric told the contractors to leave the stone on the top of the quarry and each evening he, with an employee, collected the stone and removed it to his farm, which was then in Blind Lane.

Subsequently he asked me to meet him in Blind Lane where he proudly showed me the stone he had salvaged. He offered me a piece for a Cotswold Way marker in the Square. The Cotswold Wardens picked it up the next day and erected it where it stands today. They had the ‘Bath 100m,’ cut into it and as this became a traffic sign, it was exempt from planning consent. The little plaque, which reads ‘Cotswold Way, the beginning and end was supplied by the then head warden Ted Fryer, the cost being borne by the Gloucestershire county council.

Just as a matter of interest, the Cotswold Way was the brainchild of Tony Drake a prominent rambler, who for over thirty years was an influential campaigner for the footpath network of Gloucestershire. The Cotswold Way was launched in 1970 and the beginning of the Way was at the Square. Persons who suggest it should be at St James’s church are completely wrong.

Reg Martin. (He was chairman of the north district Cotswold Wardens from the late 1970s until the early 1990s.) Campden and district historical and archaeological society.

www.chippingcampdenhistory.org.uk

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